Coping with COVID: May 4

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Coping with COVID: May 4

May 05, 2020 - 01:35
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YouMatter2 plans care packages for graduates. Destiny Watson, founder of YouMatter2, a youth community service organization, announced Monday the organization is accepting donations to help prepare care packages for eighth grade and high school graduates whose traditional ceremonies have been disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Parents or graduates can sign up at youmatter2.org/classof2020. All donations will go toward the packages. The deadline for donations is May 12.


Deaths drop again statewide. After setting a record for the number of deaths from COVID-19 in a 24-hour period on April 28, 144, the number has dropped steeply, and on Monday, the Illinois Department of Public Health announced that 46 people died from the disease in the previous 24-hour period. Gov. J.B. Pritzker said the trend was encouraging, but he cautioned against conclusions based on just a few days of good results. Numbers have fluctuated in the past. 


When to wear a mask. The new executive order requiring Illinoians to wear facial coverings in public went into effect Friday. Here is the state's guide on when and where to wear a mask. 

  • All Illinoisans should wear as mask or face covering when they must leave their home or report to work for essential operations and they either cannot or it is impractical to maintain 6 feet of physical distance between themselves and others. Examples include: 
  • Shopping at essential businesses, like grocery stores or pharmacies.
  • Picking up food from the drive thru or curbside pickup.
  • While visiting your health care provider.
  • Traveling on public transportation.
  • Interacting with customers, clients, or coworkers at essential businesses.
  • Performing essential services for state and local government agencies, such as laboratory testing, where close interactions with other people are unavoidable.
  • When feeling sick, coughing, or sneezing. 

Those who are staying home and have no close contacts that are infected with COVID-19 don’t need a mask while at home. Provided you do so alone or with close, household contacts, other situations that don’t require a mask or face covering include running or walking in your neighborhood, mowing the lawn, performing spring yard cleanup, gardening, driveway car washing, and other outdoor activities on your own property. Nevertheless we must be intentional about avoiding crowds and social distancing so we can enjoy physical connections later. 

 

By following this guidance when you must leave your home, you will reduce your fellow citizen’s exposure to respiratory droplets and infectious particles, and they yours. This will protect all of us.